Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Practice Test

Watson-Glaser™ II Critical
Thinking Appraisal

Improve decision making and accurately identify top performers

How long will your company survive if your staff makes bad decisions? The Watson-Glaser™ II Critical Thinking Appraisal is the leading critical thinking test used to assess and develop decision making skills and judgment. Thousands of organizations and schools use Watson-Glaser to hire great managers, develop high-potential employees, and admit students into challenging programs.

W-G II is an untimed fixed form test that was developed for proctored (supervised) test completion. A new timed (30 mins) equivalent item-banked version of the test, Watson-Glaser™ III, was launched in January 2018. This is suitable for both proctored and unproctored testing.

Zoom In OnAt A Glance
  • Good decision-making
  • Judgment and problem solving
  • Practical intelligence
GLOBAL PRODUCT –Available in US, UK, Australian, and Indian English, Spanish, French, and Dutch

Lens: Professional Ability and Staff Development

Untimed: 35-40 minutes

Uses: Selection, development, high potential identification, college recruiting

Watson-Glaser scores are based on our easy-to-follow RED critical thinking model

  • Recognize Assumptions: Separate fact from opinion
  • Evaluate Arguments: Impartially evaluate arguments and suspend judgment
  • Draw Conclusions: Decide your course of action.

 

Three reports let you apply the results in many ways

  • Profile Report: See the overall score, subscales, and a few predictive behaviors
  • Interview Report: Conduct a structured critical thinking behavioral interview with sample questions
  • Development Report: Build a custom learning & development plan to enhance an individual’s skills

Visit our critical thinking site www.ThinkWatson.com for tools for ongoing critical thinking skill development.

Validity

Watson-Glaser II has been extensively validated to provide the most accurate picture available of critical thinkers. W-G scores correlate with:

  • Cognitive ability (e.g., r = .60 with WAIS-IV fluid reasoning composite; n = 49)
  • Occupational and educational attainment (e.g., r = .28 with job level; n = 432; r = .33 with education level; n = 581)
  • Job performance (e.g., r = .28 with supervisory ratings of core critical thinking behaviors; n = 68)
  • Attitudes or personality preferences related to critical thinking performance (e.g., for the correlation between Watson-Glaser II Evaluate Arguments and Myers-Briggs Feeling, r = -.27, n = 60)

Click below to access our white paper “Critical Thinking eBook” and learn more how Talent assessment improves the accuracy of performance predictions in your organization.

Sample Questions

“This test has legions of fans, including JC Penney, Coors, and government intelligence agencies.”

 

Try a Watson-Glaser practice test and learn how to succeed in this success guide for the 2018 Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal.

2 useful starting-point resources

Download A 5-Step Watson-Glaser Cheatsheet

Click Here to Download

Ok, let’s get started…

A Watson-Glaser practice test is a ‘must do’ if you’ll be sitting this test for real at an interview or assessment event.

It’s the ultimate Critical Thinking test used in modern business and practising beforehand will give your chances of success a significant boost.

What should you expect from your Watson-Glaser Practice Test?

Your ability to perform across five defined criteria will be measured. Let’s take a look at each one in turn.

Watson-Glaser Practice Test – Criterion 1: Drawing Inferences

How well can you draw conclusions from facts? Like all the elements of your Watson-Glaser practice test, this area is assessing your ability to make judgements based on limited information.

Each question in this part of the assessment contains a statement that is regarded as true, followed by a selection of inferences. You will be asked to select one of five options for each inference:  True, Probably True, Inadequate Data, False and Probably False.

Watson-Glaser Practice Test – Criterion 2: Recognising Assumptions

During your Watson-Glaser practice test your ability to assess whether a statement is justifiable based on a given assumption with be tested.

You’ll be shown two statements and you have to make a judgment call on whether the second statement can be justified by the assumptions of the first. There’s no room for ‘shades of grey’, your answer must be either ‘yes’ or ‘no’.

TOP TIP: There are two different types of Watson-Glaser tests out there: The original one, usually called “Form A” or “Watson-Glaser 1” and the more modern, shorter version, usually called “Form B” or “Watson-Glaser 2.0”. The older version has 80 questions and lasts almost an hour. The newer version has 40 questions, lasts for 35 minutes and scales to a higher difficulty.

Watson-Glaser Practice Test – Criterion 3: Deductive Reasoning

A key element of your Watson-Glaser practice test is deductive reasoning. You’ll have to decide whether a follow-on statement is true based on a prior statement.

Your own knowledge must be disregarded, general knowledge is not being tested here, your decision must be based 100% on the first statement. Again, you have a binary choice in your answer: pick ‘yes’ or ‘no’.

Try A Watson-Glaser Practice Test

Click here to try our recommended Watson-Glaser practice tests

(They are high quality industry-standard tests with clear explanations.)

Watson-Glaser Practice Test – Criterion 4: Logical Interpretation

The fourth pillar of your Watson-Glaser practice test is logical interpretation. How well can you assess the weight of different arguments given a predetermined assumed-to-be-true statement?

You’ll be shown a paragraph that you must accept to be valid, and then you’ll be shown a ‘conclusion’ that follows on from the initial paragraph. You must decide whether the conclusion is fair ‘beyond reasonable doubt’. Again, you can only answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’.

Download A 5-Step Watson-Glaser Cheatsheet

Click Here to Download

Watson-Glaser Practice Test – Criterion 5: Argument Evaluation

How well can you distinguish between strong and weak arguments? This is the final element that will be measured during your Watson-Glaser practice test.

Again, you’ll be shown two passages of writing, a question statement and an answer statement and this time you must decide whether the answer statement is ‘strong’ or ‘weak’.

Try a Watson-Glaser Practice Test Now

Get hold of Watson-Glaser practice tests here.

A note about the BCAT test

The BCAT (Bar Course Aptitude Test) is based on the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal methodology. It is extremely similar to a Watson-Glaser test but not as widely used. Trainee barristers are required to take the BCAT but most companies in both the private and public sector favour the Watson-Glaser test. You can get hold of a practice BCAT test here.

Some final questions for you…

  • Lastly the Tools and Resources page is packed with useful equipment and ‘A’ List recommendations that will make your life easier.

Good luck!

I hope you enjoyed this free guide? I’d love to hear your feedback so please do get in touch and let me know. Thanks and good luck with your Watson-Glaser practice test!

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