Original Writing Coursework Ideas Para

This A-level makes Creative Writing available in the secondary curriculum in the same way that other creative art forms such as music, art and design, dance, and drama are available. It allows aspiring writers to trace a route through school/college on to higher education and beyond into professional practice within the creative industries, just as it is possible for aspiring actors, musicians and artists to do. It allows students who have enjoyed creative writing at GCSE to progress without necessarily intending to study the subject at degree level. It also offers interesting possibilities to adults who are re-entering study after a break.

This qualification complements (so does not replicate) English Language and/or Literature study. It is accessible to students not necessarily interested in language theory or literary criticism, including those focused on entirely different subject areas such as science, languages or humanities. The Assessment Objectives are modelled to some extent on other creative arts at A-level but are also informed by the principles operating within higher education, where rigorous and successful schemes of monitoring individual creative work have been devised.

Courses based on this specification will require the study and production of different types of creative and professional writing, defined here as different forms. There are four distinct forms, all of which can be produced for a range of different media. Students may write in: prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry or script; for: page, performance, radio, screen or digital media.

In this specification the following definitions apply:

Form: a type of writing: prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry or script.

Genre: a sub-division of one of the types of writing above, usually defined by content or technique: e.g. short story, travel article, sonnet, screenplay.

Medium: the route through which the writing is received: page, performance, radio, screen or digital media.

Creative Writing should not be seen solely as the production of literary texts; so while students could indeed write stories, poems and plays, they might equally produce journalism, creative non-fiction and web content.

This course encourages the developmental stages of creative work in a whole range of written forms and genres, and allows students to explore how writing is crafted in order to express individual visions. It balances the teaching of various aspects of craft with an exploration of how personal preoccupations can be given their own voice and communicated effectively. This process of discovery will inevitably examine and refer to published examples, developing students' critical and analytical skills, in order to apply them to their own work.

This A-level in Creative Writing expects students to:

  • write regularly in a range of forms and genres in order to explore writing styles and develop technical control 
  • read widely and critically, developing their writing skills by widening their experience of reading
  • share work-in-progress with others, respond productively to feedback and develop drafting and editing skills.

Narrative Essay Topics

In a narrative essay, the writer tells a story about his/her personal experience. However, treating a narrative essay like an interesting bedtime story would be a mistake. It goes further. In this type of essay, the writer should speak about his/her experience within a specific context, such as a lesson learned. With a narrative essay, the writer not only entertains the reader but also teaches him, illustrating his point of view with a real-life example.


If you are assigned to write a narrative essay, here are some narrative writing prompts:

NARRATIVE ESSAY WRITING


How to Choose a Narrative Essay Topic?

Choosing an interesting topic and thinking over short story ideas is particularly important. When writing a narrative essay you should think about your life experience in the framework of the assignment’s theme, you would like to speak about. You should always remember that even a tiny event or incident could serve a plot for an interesting narrative story. The point is that it should convey a meaning; it should be a kind of instructive story.

There is a number of helpful techniques helping to invent an essay topic. If you don’t have a clue what experience to describe, you can brainstorm with your friends, surf the Internet or use this list of sample narrative essay topics.


Before getting started to choose a topic from the list provided by our writers, let’s read one of the narrative essay examples:

NARRATIVE ESSAY EXAMPLE


In case you already have the topic to write about but need help with your essay, you can contact our essay writing service in UK to order a custom-written narrative essay with www.essaymasters.co.uk! Our professional writers are available 24/7! 

Below is the great list of short story ideas:

TOP 70 Narrative Essay Topics

  1. If I could go back in time.
  2. If I could change anything in the history, what would I choose?
  3. The time I saw the weirdest thing in my life.
  4. My most frightening experience.
  5. One thing I’m afraid to lose.
  6. If I could change one thing about me.
  7. If I had a billion dollars.
  8. If I could stop the time.
  9. The most beautiful thing in the world for me.
  10. The most pleasant sound for me.
  11. My first day at a new school.
  12. The time I lost my friend.
  13. The time I got a new friend.
  14. My first day at a new job.
  15. My most disastrous day ever.
  16. My happiest day ever.
  17. The most irritating things in my life.
  18. An experience that left me disillusioned.
  19. How I met my fear.
  20. The moment I overcome my phobia.
  21. The achievement I’m proud of.
  22. My most dangerous experience.
  23. The journey that has changed me.
  24. The experience that taught me how appearance can be deceiving.
  25. My act of heroism.
  26. My act of cowardice.
  27. A thing I would like to change in my past.
  28. My first month of living on my own.
  29. The most successful day in my life.
  30. The time I was wrong about the person.
  31. My sudden act of a kindness.
  32. What my younger sibling taught me.
  33. A time when I felt that I’m experiencing a historic event.
  34. How I started relationships.
  35. The worst quarrel with my mother.
  36. An experience I thought I would never have.
  37. The biggest risk I’ve ever taken.
  38. Why do I like being alone?
  39. The hardest decision I’ve ever made.
  40. The hardest thing I’ve ever done.
  41. What challenges have I overcome?
  42. How do I relieve stress?
  43. What do I do when I feel depressed.
  44. 5 everyday problems that bother me.
  45. Who inspires me and why.
  46. Whom would I ask to come if I had my own Talk-show?
  47. People that have changed my life.
  48. Books or movies that have changed my world view.
  49. Devices playing the biggest role in my life.
  50. Side effects of my digital life.
  51. One day or week without an access to the Internet.
  52. What my profile in social networks tells about me.
  53. What music inspires me.
  54. What music can change my mood?
  55. What movies inspire me.
  56. What role television plays in my life.
  57. What television shows have mattered to me?
  58. What reality-show I would like to participate in.
  59. What memorable poetry have I learned?
  60. What books teach me.
  61. Why do I keep (or don’t keep) a diary or journal?
  62. What words or phrases I don’t like to use.
  63. The time I learned that grammar is necessary.
  64. The greatest conversation of my life.
  65. The teacher who inspired me.
  66. The role clubs and teams play in my life.
  67. My long-time passion.
  68. What superhero power I would like to have.
  69. Why I like (or don’t like) cooking.
  70. Waiting in line story.

More about a narrative essay:

NARRATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE


Have you already chosen a topic for your narrative essay? If not, feel free to contact our professional writers as they will offer a lot of topics to write about. Place an order for getting an instant quote for your narrative essay.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *